A majority of Doppler survey respondents are ready for internet voting

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In a small sampling of Doppler readers, the majority indicated that they agree with council’s decision (still to be ratified) to use internet and telephone voting for the next municipal election.

Of the respondents, 52 per cent chose internet and telephone voting, 38 per cent want to see a return to traditional voting at polling stations, and just 10 per cent prefer to continue with the vote-by-mail method used in the 2014 election.

Those in favour of internet and telephone voting gave as their reasons: it’s convenient; it’s accessible to all voters (almost everyone has access to either internet or a phone); it would encourage more people to vote, particularly young people; it removes the issue of distance for people who are away; it uses new technology; and it would likely cost less.

Some people can’t get to the polling stations. Some people find it a hassle and won’t go to vote. As long as there is a way to make sure people only get one vote, no cheating.

Respondents who want to continue with a vote-by-mail method cited security of data, lack of internet access for some, the ability to trace results and convenience as support for their choice.
While no method is without issues, voting by mail appears to be the option that best balances security concerns with convenience for all eligible voters.

Respondents who want to return to traditional polling stations presented security as their primary reason for their choice, along with accountability and verifiability; and its inclusive nature for those not comfortable with technology.

It has been well demonstrated that the internet can, has and will be “hacked” so there will always be a privacy and reliability concern. At least with the traditional voting method you have to present yourself so there should be no question of someone else voting for you, and would also prevent fraud i.e. dead people voting, etc.

One respondent added: “voting is a privilege that should be exercised.” We couldn’t agree more.

[Note: this is an informal poll; responses may be skewed by the online nature of the survey.]

Related story: Huntsville to vote by internet and telephone in 2018 election

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1 Comment

  1. I have two issues with internet voting. The first is that it is far too easy to sit at your computer and make your choice. I favour the effort involved in presenting at the polling station, having your name validated on the voters’ list, and marking your secret ballot. I have no faith that an internet vote will remain secret, or that votes will not be lost in a system crash. I have nothing but sympathy for voters who cannot attend in person, but the telephone is a better alternative.

    For the second, please ask Al Gore how he feels about the Presidency he lost; due to the chad fiasco in Florida. Nobody should ever be deprived of office due to convoluted voting measures, as he was, when suitable alternatives are available.

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